Statistics At-A-Glance


CDC Updates - 
2011 data

 

Fact Sheets by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy


National Data

  • The United States has the highest rates of teen pregnancy and teen births, and abortion in the fully industrialized world. (1)
  • Three in ten girls in the U.S. become pregnant at least once before age 20; that’s over 750,000 teen pregnancies a year. (2)
  • In the last 20 years, the U.S. has made great progress in reducing teen pregnancy among all racial/ ethnic groups. (3)
  • In 2012, the birth rate for all teenagers aged 15-19 was 29.4 births per 1000 females, a 6% decline from 2011 and the lowest level ever reported - read the full report here.

 

State of Georgia Data

GCAPP has launched a statewide 15 by 15 goal, to achieve a 15% reduction in the adolescent pregnancy rate for girls ages 15 to 19 in Georgia by year 2015. . Great news! As of 2012, we have more than doubled our goal. The adolescent pregnancy rate has declined 35%.  For a fact sheet of Georgia statistics, please click here.

 

 

Teen Pregnancies in Georgia:  2008-2011 (4)

Georgia 10-14 Years

 

Pregnancies

Pregnancy Rate

2011

360

1.1

2010

365

1.1

2009

405

1.2

2008

421

1.3

Georgia 15-17 Years

 

Pregnancies

Pregnancy Rate

2011

5,121

25.3

2010

5,743

28.0

2009

6,372

30.8

2008

7,160

34.9

Georgia 18-19 Years

 

Pregnancies

Pregnancy Rate

2011

11,897

86.0

2010

12,921

91.8

2009

14,514

102.9

2008

15,071

107.7

(8)

 

  • Georgia has the 17th highest teen birth rate in the nation. (5)*
  • In just one year, the Georgia teen birth rate fell 12%. There were 33.8 births per 1,000 teens in 2012. This is the second highest decline reported in the US and District of Columbia. (5)
  • In 2011, the birth rate per 1,000 girls was 26.4 among Caucasian (non-Hispanic) girls, compared to 45.4 among African Americans (non-Hispanic) and 57.7 among Hispanic/ Latino girls. (4)
  • There were 9,721 first births among teens in 2011, and 2,493 repeat births. This means that 19.5 percent of all births among teens ages 15-19 years old were repeat births. (4)
  • In 2011, there were 17,018 teen pregnancies in Georgia; 45% were among African-Americans, 31% were among Whites and 14% were among Hispanics. About 1 in 4 of these pregnancies were repeat pregnancies among teens. (4)
  • Between 1994 and 2011, the teen birth rate decreased in Georgia by 46%.  During those years, it decreased by 48% among Caucasians, 37% among Hispanics, and 56% among African-Americans. (4)
  • Over the last decade, the birth rate in Georgia among girls ages 10-19 years old has declined, from 29.6 in 2001 to 19.2 in 2011. (4)
  • Births to girls under age 15 made up 1.4% of all births to girls under age 20 in 2011. (6)
  • Over 44 births occur each day in Georgia.
  • According to the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Georgia is ranked 21th for highest Chlamydia rate in the United States, 11th for gonorrhea, 4th for Syphilis, and 9th in AIDS cases nationally. (7)

 

*All teen birth and teen pregnancy data refers to teen girls ages 15-19 years old, except where otherwise noted.

 

The Costs

Preventing teen pregnancy is an effective strategy for improving child well-being in our state. Many of the individual indicators of child well-being in which Georgia ranks in the bottom 10 of the 50 states are highly interrelated with teen pregnancy.

  • An updated analysis from The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy shows that teen childbearing in Georgia cost taxpayers at least $395 million in 2010. Nationally, teen childbearing costs taxpayers at least $9.4 billion each year. Annual taxpayer costs associated with teen pregnancy include public health care, child welfare, increased rates of incarceration of children of teen parents, and lost tax revenue due to decreased earnings and spending. (6)'
  • Between 1991 and 2010 there have been 351,013 teen births in Georgia, costing taxpayers a total of $10.3 billion over that period. (6)
  • The teen birth rate in Georgia declined 45% between 1991 and 2010. The progress Georgia has made in reducing teen childbearing saved taxpayers an estimated $492 million in 2010 alone compared to the costs they would have incurred had the rates not fallen. (6)

Georgia ranks:

  • 43rd overall in child well-being (9)
  • 45th in low-birth weight babies - Children of teen mothers are more likely to be born prematurely and at low birth weight.  (9)
  • 26th in infant mortality - Children of teen mothers are more likely to be born prematurely, raising the probability of infant mortality. (9)
  • 42nd for teens not in school and not high school graduates (9)
  • 45th for teens not attending school and not working - Teen mothers are less likely to complete the education necessary to qualify for well-paying jobs. Plus, having multiple children compounds the challenges a teen mother faces to finish school or keep a job. (9)
  • 42nd for children in poverty (9)
  • 41st for single-parent families - Evidence shows that unmarried teen mothers are at greater risk for long term single motherhood and poverty for themselves and their chidlren (9)

 (8)


Sources:

1. Teen Birth Rates: How Does the United States Compare? (March 2012)- The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

2. Why it matters: Linking Teen Pregnancy Prevention to Other Critical Social Issues (March 2010) - The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

3. Teen Childbearing in the United States, Preliminary 2012 Birth Data (December 2013) – The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

4.  Online Analytical Statistical Information System (OASIS), Georgia Department of Community Health, Division of Public Health, Office of Health Information and Policy. 

5.  Births: Final Data for 2012 (December 2013) – National Vital Statistics System,  National Center for Health Statistics, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

6. Georgia Adolescent Reproductive Health Facts (August 2013), Office of Adolescent Health, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and The Public Costs of Teen Childbearing in Georgia in 2010

7. The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (2011).   50 State Comparisons.

8. Teen Childbearing in Georgia Costs Taxpayers $465 Million Annually (June 2011) – The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

9. Georgia Indicators. Nationals KIDS COUNT data center, The Anne E. Casey Foundation.